Schedule

PART 1. INTRODUCTION


Week 1: Why Study History


Wednesday, August 24 – Introduction to the Course

IN CLASS

  • The need for a historical understanding of the contemporary world, one that combines area studies and global history approaches
  • The map of the world (in preparation for Friday’s assignment)

QUICK ASSIGNMENTS AFTER CLASS

For More Reading


Friday, August 26—Introduction to the Study of History

PREPARATION

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Why study history, according to Peter Stearns?
  • Which of his reasons resonates with you? Which would you question?
  • What does Steinmetz-Jenkins mean by the “liberal international world order”?
  • What is “presentism”? Is it bad or good for S-J? What do you think?
  • What, according to Michael Hunt, are the uses of history?
  • What does he see as the limits of history?
  • What does your map of the world look like?

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

IN CLASS

  • How to think like a historian
  • Understanding what history is good for / and what it is not good for
  • Putting recent history into historical perspective
  • Visualizing the world – a class exercise

Week 2: An Introduction to the History of the World


Monday, August 29, Beyond Eurocentrism – An Introduction to World History

PREPARATION

  • If you haven’t already, please be sure to complete this brief survey so I can better get to know you
  • Read Robert Marks, The Origins of the Modern World (2020), “Introduction: The Rise of the West?” – at Moodle Readings folder
  • Sign up to write a blog entry on a class session here on Moodle. I’ll need two volunteers for each of our meetings this week to get us started

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • We’re reading the introduction to Robert Marks global narrative of the origins of the modern world from 1400 to the present. Marks provides a helpful introduction to thinking about global history. After you read, you should be able to answer the following questions and discuss the following terms.
  • Note the “four interrelated themes” that Marks thinks define the modern world: Industrialization, nation-states, gap between wealthiest and poorest parts of the world, and the impact of people on the environment
  • Remember: your best way to prepare for class is to keep a notebook with a few well-chosen notes on the reading and the study questions
  • What is the story of the “rise of the West”? What is wrong with the story? Is it entirely wrong?
  • What is “Eurocentrism”? And what is wrong with it?
  • What is historical contingency? For example?
  • What is historical accident? For example?
  • What is historical conjuncture? For example?
  • What picture does Marks give of the world in 1400?
  • How does Marks seem to explain the industrial and military success of Europe after 1800?

IN CLASS

  • Against Eurocentrism
  • A broad picture of modern history – with reference to contingency
    • what do we mean by “modernity”?
    • the West and the rest?

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • William Bielski
  • Miles Gutmann

Wednesday, August 31—Nationalism and Post-Colonial Studies

PREPARATION

  • Register for a Voices account (if you don’t already have one) by completing this form. Then I will be able to add you as an Author on our Voices site and you will be able to post a blog entry for the entire class. You can choose any username you like, but be sure to use your Wooster email address.
  • Take note, I’ve added a folder on Moodle with pdfs of our class presentations. You can find them here if you want to check in on something you missed or look them over as you prepare for exams or papers.
  • Read Benedict Anderson, “Imagined Communities” (1991) – at Moodle Readings folder
  • Read Dipesh Chakrabarty, “Provincializing Europe” (2000) – at Moodle Readings folder

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • These pdfs are excerpts of influential books that have helped us think about nationalism and post-colonial studies. You’ve heard some echoes of their ideas in Marks already.
  • Anderson argues that three concepts had to fall away before it was possible to “imagine the nation”: a single language of truth, a belief in divine rule, a vision of time in which human history was indistinguishable from cosmology.
  • What was “print-capitalism”? And what was its impact? How was it involved in religious controversies?
  • What is a “nation”? What picture comes across of how nations are formed?
  • What is this “Europe” that Chakrabarty wants to decenter or “provincialize”?
  • What are the concepts of “political modernity”? What value do they have? Are they universal? Should they be universal?
  • What is the “contradictory relationship” between European thought and political modernity?
  • What is the postcolonial critique of historicism that C presents?

IN CLASS

  • Be sure we have two students ready to blog our class today
  • Watch Professor Shaya’s short lecture
    • Anderson and the history of the nation
    • Chakrabarty and post-colonial studies
    • Revising the history of the 20th c. – taking a global view
  • Discuss: Universal human rights? Decentering European ideals? What does a global history look like

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Belle Champion
  • Hunter Arce

Friday, September 2—Globalization and looking to the future

PREPARATION

  • Read Marks, Origins of the Modern World, “Conclusion: Changes, Continuities, and the Shape of the Future” – at Moodle Readings folder
  • There is no assignment due before class. However, there will be an in-class assignment on Friday to process the work of the week. If you can, please bring your laptop to class. Everyone won’t need their own – we’ll just need one laptop per small group

Study Questions

  • I ask you to read the conclusion to Marks book. It includes a brief summary of the book and some reflections on globalization and the future. Some questions to consider:
  • When did the divergence of Europe and the rest of the world occur? And why?
  • How should we explain what has been called “the rise of the West”?
  • What is the “Anthropocene”?
  • We’re living in an age of globalization, right? But it turns out that there have been several waves of globalization. Take a look at the second wave – of the era around 1900. What did globalization look like in this period?
  • Where, according to Marks, is the next wave of globalization likely to be centered?
  • Now, far more open-ended: what have you learned in these first few classes that might change the way you think about the world today?

For more fun

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Angelina Bolivar
  • Zoë Semersky

Week 3: The World in 1900


Monday, September 5—The World in 1900: Jaffa (with Prof. Friedman)

PREPARATION

  • Read selection from William Duiker, The Contemporary World, chap. 2, pp. 28-52
    • There is a lot here. Don’t worry about understanding all of the details, but do read carefully for the larger themes of the chapters on imperial rule and resistance
    • I’d like you to focus on a few sections and key themes. Read more carefully:
      • Sections 2-1 and 2-2 on colonial systems
      • Section 2-3 on British colonialism in INdia
      • Section 2-5 on Africa
      • Section 2-6 on patterns of resistance

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What picture of the world in the late 19th and early 20th c. comes through from Duiker?
  • What picture of European imperialism?
  • Of the British Raj?
  • Of Africa?
  • Of colonial conflict and resistance?

IN CLASS

  • Introduction to the world in 1900
  • Jaffa

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Shui Mauser
  • Brage Golding

Wednesday, September 7—The World in 1900: Kolkata and Yokohama (with Prof. Bonk)

PREPARATION

  • Read selection from William Duiker, The Contemporary World, chap. 3, pp. 53-73.
    • Same story. There is a lot of detail. Focus on the larger themes and key examples.
    • You can skip the special sections, “Opposing Viewpoints” and “Historical Voices,” but you might read the last part, “Making Connections”

Study Questions

  • What picture of the world in the late 19th and early 20th c. comes through from Duiker?
  • What picture of China?
  • Of Japan?
  • Of imperialism and western influence?

IN CLASS

  • How to think like a historian
  • Kolkata in 1900
  • Yokohama in 1900

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Alex Nathanson
  • Kyung Seo Kim

Friday, September 9*—The World in 1900: Rio de Janeiro and Dakar (with Prof. Holt and Prof. Sene)

PREPARATION

  • No additional reading. Finish reading in Duiker if necessary.
  • Complete weekly assignment below.

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

  • Due Friday at 9am before class meets
  • Complete Week #3 Assignment on Forms – which is a brief check-in on some of the work we’ve done

IN CLASS

  • Rio de Janeiro
  • Dakar

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Huiseong Jo
  • Seth Wanner

Week 4: Global Power Dynamics (and Exam #1 on Part 1)


Monday, September 12—Europe and the World (Prof. Shaya)

PREPARATION

  • Read Duiker, The Contemporary World, Chap. 10, “Postwar Europe: On the Path to Unity?”
    • There is a lot of detail here. Please focus on the following sections
      • The introduction, 10-1, 10-2, 10-3, 10-4, 10-5c, 10-5d, Making Connections, and Historical Voices: Manifesto for Germany (255)

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • How should we conceptualize post-1945 European history?
  • What were the key reasons for European recovery after WWII?
  • What is the welfare state? What does it look like in Europe?
  • How should we understand the differences between Eastern and Western Europe?
  • What is the European Union – and what are the prospects for a united Europe?
  • What are some of the social and political challenges in Europe today?
  • What is the Alternative for Germany and its program?

IN CLASS

  • Europe in broad historical perspective
  • Europe since 1945
  • Handout updated Exam Study Guide

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Darren Mickley
  • Tudor Lungu

Wednesday, September 14—The US and the World (Prof. Roche)

PREPARATION

  • Read Daniel Immerwahr, How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States, introduction and conclusion
  • Read through the Exam #1 Study Guide before class

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What was the US doing in the Philippines?
  • What is the place of Puerto Rico in the United States?
  • What is the logo map? And what is wrong with it?
  • What are (and what have been) the territories of the US?
  • What does it mean to say that the US is an empire?
  • What is the relationship of Saipan and the Northern Marianas to the United States?
  • What is the enduring relevance of empire to the history of the United States?

IN CLASS

  • The US and the World
  • The Greater United States
  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Ryan Seaton-Evans
  • Logan Pugh

Thursday, September 15—Optional Online Review Session


Friday, September 16—First Exam on PART 1 of course

IN CLASS

  • Exam #1 – bring your laptop and be ready to start at 11:00

DETAILS ON EXAM


PART 2. REGIONAL PERSPECTIVES


Week 5: Latin America in Historical Perspective (Prof. Holt)


Monday, September 19—Latin America in Broad Perspective

PREPARATION

  • Thomas Holloway, “Latin America: What’s in a Name?” from A Companion to Latin American History (2008) – at Moodle Readings folder
  • Phillip Berryman, “Highly Unequal—And Middle Class?” in Latin America at 200 – at Moodle Readings folder

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Where did the idea of “Latin” America come from?
  • What, according to Holloway, might be some better categories to use to analyze this region? (Hint: how might we subdivide this larger region?)
  • (True/False). Latin America is statistically the most unequal region in the world.
  • How has the proportion of Latin Americans living in poverty changed in recent years?
  • By the way, what are the UN Millennium Development Goals?
  • What are some measures of inequality in Latin America?
  • How does Berryman account for Latin American inequality? That is, why are Latin American societies so unequal?
  • What are some signs of the rising middle class in Latin America?
  • What does the level of taxation look like in most Latin American countries?

IN CLASS

  • Class presentation
    • Legacies of Colonialism
    • Transculturation
    • Pre-Contact Americas
    • Imperialism
    • Independence
    • Neo-Colonialism
  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Jamie Do
  • Ali Moros Taylor

Wednesday, September 21—Latin America in the 20th c.

PREPARATION

  • Duiker, Contemporary History, on postwar Latin America
    • Read the short section 8-5, “Democracy, Dictatorship, and Development in Latin America Since 1945,” pp. 210-218

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What has been the place of democracy in LA? Where and in what conditions has it thrived?
  • What has been the place of dictatorship in LA? Where and in what conditions has it thrived?
  • How should we tell the economic story of LA since 1945?
  • Think about differences. What different narratives can we tell about Argentina, for example?
  • Or Brazil?
  • Mexico?
  • Cuba?
  • Venezuela?

IN CLASS

  1. Class presentation
    1. Mexico
    2. Cuba
    3. Brazil

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Armando Abarca-Salvador
  • Clare Mackin

Friday. September 23—Discussion

PREPARATION

  • Read Eduardo Galleano, Upside Down (1998) (selections) – at Moodle Readings folder

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

IN CLASS

  • Small group discussion
  • Questions for Prof. Holt

Week 6: Africa in Historical Perspective (Prof. Sene)


Monday, September 26—Africa in Broad Perspective

PREPARATION

  • Read Jonathan Reynolds, “Africa’s Role in World History” (Berkshire, 2011) – at Moodle Readings folder

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Why is Africa’s place in history contentious?
  • Where does the idea that Africa is without history come from?
  • What do Hume & Hegel say about Africa in history?
  • What are some views of Afrocentric history?
  • What are drawbacks of area studies approach to history?
  • What is insight of Patrick Manning? (Or, what are “zones of interaction”?)
  • Name 4 African countries and one important detail of their histories

IN CLASS

  • How to Write the History of Africa
  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Oliver Snow
  • Cody Mox

Wednesday, September 28—Africa Since 1945

PREPARATION

  • Duiker, Contemporary History, on 20th c. Africa
    • Read in Chapter 14, introduction, 14-1 and 14-2, including inset boxes pp. 345-358.

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What were the colonial legacies in postwar Africa?
  • Who were the nationalists that pushed for the independence of African states?
  • What was Pan-Africanism? And how has the dream of African unity fared?
  • What has Neo-colonialism in Africa looked like?
  • Think about differences. What different narratives can we tell about Tanzania, for example
  • Or Kenya?
  • South Africa?
  • Nigeria?
  • Rwanda and Burundi?
  • What are some of the chronic economic challenges in Africa?
  • And what are some signs of optimism in contemporary Africa?

IN CLASS

  • Introduction to African History
  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Desmond Conn
  • Huiseong Jo

Friday, September 30Discussion

PREPARATION

  • Read Brookings Institution, “Foresight Africa: Top Priorities for the Continent 2020-2030” (2020) – at Moodle Readings folder
  • Complete weekly assignment on Africa before class

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

IN CLASS

  • Small group discussion
  • Questions for Prof. Sene

Week 7: East Asia in Historical Perspective


Monday, October 3—East Asia in Broad Perspective (with Prof. Bonk)

PREPARATION

  • Duiker, Contemporary History, on East Asia in the 20th c.
    • Read in Chapter 11, introduction, 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-4, and the conclusion,  “Making Connections”
    • There are a lot of details here! I’d like you to take away a big picture. Use the study questions to guide your reading
    • Note that we won’t be discussing this reading in class, but you will need it for the assignment due on Friday

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • How did Japan make the transition from a defeated war nation (in 1945) to a democracy and economic powerhouse in the late 20th c.?
  • What are the challenges facing Japan today?
  • What is Taiwan’s relationship with the US and China?
  • What is the source of the division of Korea into North and South?
  • How has South Korea changed in the decades since the Korean War? And how have those changes been experience?
  • What are the economic roles and political situations of Singapore and Hong Kong?

IN CLASS

  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Dorion Talley
  • Oumaima Ihiri
  • Natalie Miller

Wednesday, October 5—From Empire to Republic: China and the West (with Prof. Bonk)

PREPARATION

  • Duiker, Contemporary History, on China in the 20th c.
    • Read Chapter 12. Feel free to ignore the features (such as “Movies and History” and “Historical Voices”)
    • There are a lot of details here! I’d like you to take away a big picture. Use the study questions to guide your reading

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • How did Mao intend to remake China?
  • What was the Great Leap Forward? And the Cultural Revolution?
  • What was the turn promoted by Deng Xiaoping?
  • What are the promises of the current leader of China, President Xi Jinping?
  • How would you tell the story of economic change in China across the late 20th c. to the present?
  • How has Chinese society changed?
  • How has Chinese culture changed?

IN CLASS

  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS – BLOG ENTRIES FROM

  • Logan Burger
  • Verity Curran

Friday, October 7—Discussion

PREPARATION

  • Read (this short opinion piece) Amitai Etzioni, “Is China a New Colonial Power?” The Diplomat (2020) – online at The Diplomat and in the Moodle Readings Folder
  • Then complete the weekly assignment on East Asia

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

IN CLASS

  • Discussion

FALL BREAK 10/8-10/16


Week 8: The Middle East in Historical Perspective (Prof. Friedman)


Monday, October 17—The Middle East in Broad Perspective

PREPARATION

  • Read Dona J. Stewart, The Middle East Today: Political Geographical and Cultural Perspectives (2009), pp. 1-39.
    • This reading is taken from a text that discusses both the Middle East and North Africa. In our sessions this week, however, we will not discuss North Africa, except for Egypt. Therefore you don’t need to concern yourself with material relevant specifically to North Africa.

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Key names & terms:
    • The Ottoman Empire, the Middle East
    • Orientalism
    • “clash of civilizations”
    • Islamists/Islamic fundamentalists, Jihadis
  • What incorrect ideas did medieval Christians hold about Islam?
  • What does Edward Said mean by orientalism?
  • How do Bernard Lewis and Samuel Huntington explain the contemporary hostility between “the west” and much of the Muslim world?
  • According to this reading, what is wrong with all these grand explanations about the divide between “the west” and Islam? What alternative explanation does this author advance?

IN CLASS

  • Class presentation
  • Discussion

Wednesday, October 19—The Middle East in the 20th c.

PREPARATION

  • Read Duiker, Contemporary History, on the Middle East post 1945
    • Read Chapter 15
    • There are a lot of details here! We’d like you to take away a big picture. Use the study questions to guide your reading

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What is pan-Arabism? And how has the idea panned out?
  • How does the textbook explain the sources of the Israel-Palestine conflict?
  • What picture of Iranian politics comes out here?
  • What led the US to war in Afghanistan and Iraq?
  • What are some reasons for the challenges of democracy in the Middle East?
  • How would you explain the economics of the Middle East?
  • What is the “Islamic revival” in the Middle East? What is an example of it?
  • What was (what is?) the Arab Spring?

IN CLASS

  • Class presentation
  • Discussion

AFTER CLASS

  • After class the Friday assignment will be posted on Forms. Start with the reading on Friday and then complete the questions on the assignment

Friday, October 21—Discussion

PREPARATION

  • Read Declarations of Independence of Israel (1948) and Palestine (1988)

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Taking into account both structure and content, in what ways do these two documents resemble each other? How do you account for those resemblances
  • What role does religion play in each document?
  • How does each of these two groups define themselves
  • How does each define the other?
  • How does each envision the place of the other in their new state?

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

  • Due Friday at 9am before class meets
  • Complete Week 8 Assignment on the Middle East – available on Forms – will be posted after class on Wednesday

IN CLASS

  • Discussion

Week 9: South Asia in Historical Perspective


Monday, October 24—South Asia in Broad Perspective

PREPARATION

  • Read Duiker, Contemporary History, on South Asia since Independence
    • Read the first half of Chapter 13 – introduction, section 13-1, including inset boxes, pp. 321-333

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • How did India and Pakistan gain independence?
  • What were the contrasting visions of Gandhi and Nehru?
  • What were some of the domestic and international challenges faced by newly independent India?
  • What do the major Indian parties – the Congress and BJP – stand for today?
  • What defined the new state of Pakistan at independence?
  • What are some of the challenges faced by Pakistan in the last decades?
  • How would you explain the religious tensions in India?
  • How would you explain the economic development of India?

IN CLASS

  • Brief intro to research paper
  • Introduction to history of South Asia

After Class – sometime this week – Blog POsts on News, Songs, or Discussion From

  • William Bielski
  • Kyung Seo Kim
  • Jamie Do
  • Huiseong Jo

Wednesday, October 26—South Asia in the 20th c.

PREPARATION

  • Read Research Paper Assignment – on our Voices site under Assignments
  • Read Duiker, Contemporary History, conclusion on South & Southeast Asia since Independence
    • Read “Making Connections” in Chapter 13 – pp. 343-344

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What questions do you have about the research paper assignment?
  • What might you want to work on?
  • What picture does Duiker give of the historical trajectory of South and Southeast Asia?

IN CLASS

  • Research Paper assignment
  • History of India and Pakistan

AFTER CLASS

  • After class the Friday assignment will be posted on Forms. Start with the reading on Friday and then complete the questions on the assignment

Friday, October 28—Discussion

PREPARATION

Study Questions

  • What are the main reasons that critics like Chandrachaud oppose the Citizenship Amendment Act? What is the connection between this law and the National Registry of Citizens (NRC)?
  • What, according to Chandrachaud, does this law reveal about conceptions of citizenship in India today? How does he connect this to the longer postcolonial history of India?
  • What does the passage of the CAA reveal about political tensions and conflicts between the various state of postcolonial South Asia? How are these conflicts shaped by colonial legacies, and how do they reflect subsequent political and social movements in the region?

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT DUE FRIDAY MORNING

  • Due Friday at 9am before class meets
  • Complete Week 9 Assignment on South Asia – available on Forms – will be posted after class on Wednesday

IN CLASS

  • Research Paper Model (Drew)
  • Discussion of South Asian History
  • Citizenship & Identity

PART 3. THEMATIC PERSPECTIVES


Week 10: Review and Exam #2 on Part 2


Monday, October 31—Halloween! And Catch up Date

PREPARATION

  • Catch up on any assignments you may have missed
  • Give some thought to your Final Paper
    • Re-read the assignment, look for news articles, look for journal articles

IN CLASS

  • There will be no regular class meeting! I will be in class as usual in Kauke 244. Student attendance is optional
  • Come if you would like a little help or to talk over the work we are doing. We can discuss paper topics and bibliography – or material we’ve covered in our regional survey of world history
  • Feel free to bring reading and computers and read/work in class

After Class – sometime this week – Blog POsts on News, Songs, or Discussion From

  • Natalie Miller
  • Zoë Semersky
  • Angelina Bolivar
  • Verity Curran
  • Desmond Conn

Wednesday, November 2—Review of Our Regional Studies of the World

PREPARATION

  • Read the Class Notes for Part II of the course (at class notes)
  • Review your own notes
  • Review your weekly assignments from Part II of the course
  • Note that the presentations and Friday handouts are available on Moodle
  • Read the Study Guide for Exam #2 – on our Handouts page – and get ready for the exam

IN CLASS

  • Answer questions about the paper assignment
  • Prepare for the Friday exam
  • Review and discuss
    • How to think historically
    • Latin America
    • Africa
    • East Asia
    • Middle East
    • South Asia
  • Look forward to thinking globally

Friday, November 4—Second Exam

IN CLASS

  • We will take the second exam in class
  • Please bring your laptop
  • Remember that you cannot use any resources as you take the exam

DETAILS ON EXAM


Week 11: Globalization and Mobility (and Final Paper Projects)


Monday, November 7—Global Capitalism

PREPARATION

  • Read Duiker, Contemporary History, on the Post-Cold War world and global capitalism
    • Read Chapter 16, parts 16-1 and 16-2, pp. 396-405
  • Check out Our World in Data on “Trade and Globalization” – online here
    • There is a lot of information – and a lot of charts here. Don’t let them overwhelm you!
    • Read the “Summary.” See the Growth of Global Exports, check out the map of cargo ships, take a look at one or two other charts
  • Recommended (but entirely optional)
    • James Suzman, Sharon Bessell, and Arnagretta Hunter, “Podcast: Work with James Suzman” Asia & the Pacific Policy Society online at Policy Forum
    • David Graeber and David Wengrow, “Ancient History Shows How We Can Create a More Equal World,” New York Times (2021) – online at NYTimes
    • Miriam Ching Yoon Louie, “Sweatshop Warriors, Immigrant Women Workers Take on the Global Factory” (2001) – at Moodle Readings folder
    • Nicholas Kristof, “The Best News You Don’t Know,” New York Times (2016) – at Moodle Readings folder
  • Do some work on your research paper
    • Reread the assignment
    • Gather news sources that interest you – and start your bibliography
    • Come to class with your idea for the final paper

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What is globalization?
  • How has global capitalism reshaped the world?
  • What can we see as the costs of globalization?

IN CLASS

  • Introduction to globalization
  • Global capitalism in historical perspective
  • Talk about research paper ideas

After Class – sometime this week – Blog POsts on News, Songs, or Discussion From

  • Alex Nathanson
  • Tudor Lungu
  • Logan Burger
  • Dorion Talley
  • Hunter Arce

Wednesday, November 9—Immigration and Mobility

PREPARATION

  • Read Duiker, Contemporary History, on migration (just a couple pages)
    • Read “The Great Escape,” pp. 404-405, and “Migration and Climate Change,” p. 406
  • Recommended (but entirely optional)
    • Patrick Manning, Migration in World History
    • Check out the “World Migration Report 2020” United Nations IOM – online at IOM UN
    • See the United Nations High Commission on Refugees – online at UNHCR
    • Mark Sachleben, “Human Migration: Immigration, Emigration, and Refugees”, from World Politics on Screen (2014) – at Moodle Readings folder
    • Maansi Kumar and Amyaz Moledina, “Mobility Studies: An inclusive interdisciplinary approach to understanding migration”at Challenging Borders (2017) – online at Challenging Borders
    • “The US Immigration Debate,” Council on Foreign Relations Backgrounder (2021) – online at CFR
    • Julia Laite, “Migration and Mobility” Introduction to Virtual Special Issue, History Workshop online at History Workshop
    • “Infectious Disease Movement in a Borderless World: Workshop Summary” (2010) – online at NIH
  • Continue work on your research paper
    • Draft your research paper proposal – I’m going to ask you about it in class
    • At the very least you should have a topic, your research question, and an initial bibliography
    • Don’t put this off! You have about two weeks to do most of your work on this paper. Start now (if you haven’t already)

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • How do we define immigration, emigration, refugees, domestic migration?
  • What are the forces that “push” or “pull” migrants?
  • Why is the politics of immigration so contentious?

IN CLASS

  • Migration in human history
  • Immigration in the contemporary world
  • The contentious politics of migration
  • Research papers

Friday, November 11—Final Projects

PREPARATION

  • For Friday you will need to turn in your Research Paper proposal before class (on Moodle) and bring in two printed copies of your proposal (to class)
  • Take time to review the Research Paper Assignment
  • Review the Sample Paper Proposal to see what a strong proposal looks like – on Handouts page

PAPER PROPOSAL DUE BY FRIDAY MORNING

  • Paper proposal is due Friday at 9am before class meets. Submit electronically as a pdf to Moodle
  • Bring two printed copies to class

IN CLASS

  • Announce: signup for blog posts, extra credit for ¶ on culture show
  • Questions about global capitalism/globalization & immigration/mobility
  • Research paper questions
  • Discuss final projects in small groups and together

Week 12: Environmental History, Democracy & International Cooperation


Monday, November 14—An Environmental History of the Twentieth-Century World

PREPARATION

  • Read Duiker, Contemporary World on the environment
    • Read 16-6, “One World, One Environment,” 417-423
  • Continue work on research paper

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What is the “health of the planet”?
  • What is the ongoing impact of climate change?

IN CLASS

  • First
    • Culture Show reflections?
    • Look forward to schedule – poster sessions after TG
    • Talk plagiarism
  • The History of the Environment
  • Discussion

After Class – sometime this week – Blog POsts on News, Songs, or Discussion From

  • Logan Pugh
  • Shui Mauser
  • Ali Moros Taylor
  • Darren Mickley
  • Ryan Seaton-Evans

Wednesday, November 16—Democracy & Authoritarianism

Preparation

  • Read Duiker, Contemporary World on the environment
    • 16-4, “Democracy in Crisis,” 410-413 (focusing on Europe and US, but we’ll use these examples
    • “Can Liberal Democracy Be Exported,” 426-427
  • Continue work on research paper

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Why “democracy in crisis”?
  • What is the state of democracy in Europe? In the US?
  • What is liberal democracy, anyway?
  • What are the prospects for democracy around the world?

IN CLASS

  • Democracy and authoritarianism
  • Discussion

For more on the subject


Friday, November 18—International Cooperation

PREPARATION

IN CLASS

  • Guidelines for presentations
  • Talk about international organizations
  • Discuss research papers

PART 4. CONCLUSIONS


Week 13: Final Paper Workshop


Monday, November 21—Final Paper Workshop

PREPARATION

  • For Monday’s class you will need to turn in your Research Paper outline and initial draft (before class on Moodle) and bring two hard copies of these materials to class
    • Outline: a simple outline that includes: title, statement of topic, thesis, issue/event in the news, historical perspectives, and conclusion
    • Initial draft. At a minimum: introduction (with thesis) and presentation of issue/event in the news. You may bring in more: historical perspectives, conclusion (may include some parts in outline form)
  • Take time to review the Research Paper Assignment
  • See the Sample Short Paper for format guidelines – on Handouts page
  • Review the Sample Research Paper to see what a strong paper looks like – on Handouts page

Outline and Draft DUE BY Monday MORNING

  • Outline and initial draft are due Monday at 9am before class meets. Submit electronically as a single pdf to Moodle
  • Bring two printed copies to class (you’ll keep one copy with your notes – and turn the other one in to me)

IN CLASS

  • Turn in hard copies of outline and draft
  • Sample poster presentation
  • Workshop paper outline and drafts

After Class – sometime BEFORE LAST WEEK OF CLASSES – Blog POsts on News, Songs, or Discussion From

  • Armando Abarca-Salvador
  • Brage Golding
  • Clare Makin
  • Cody Mox
  • Miles Gutmann
  • Oliver Snow

Wednesday, November 23—No Class – Thanksgiving


THANKSGIVING BREAK


Week 14: Putting the Present into Historical Perspective (Class Conference)


Poster Presentations this week


Monday, November 28—Class Conference

IN CLASS

  • Poster presentations by
    • Alex Nathanson
    • Clare Mackin
    • Cody Mox
    • Huiseong Jo
    • Kyung Seo Kim
    • Logan Burger
    • Shui Mauser
    • Tudor Lungu
    • William Bielski

Wednesday, November 30—Class Conference

IN CLASS

  • Poster presentations by
    • Angelina Bolivar
    • Darren Mickley
    • Dorion Talley
    • Hunter Arce
    • Jamie Do
    • Oliver Snow
    • Ryan Seaton-Evans
    • Verity Curran

Friday, December 2—Class Conference

IN CLASS

  • Poster presentations by
    • Ali Moros Taylor
    • Armando Abarca-Salvador
    • Brage Golding
    • Desmond Conn
    • Logan Pugh
    • Miles Gutmann
    • Natalie Miller
    • Zoë Semersky

Saturday, December 3—Final Paper Due

  • Final Paper Due
  • Submit electronically as a pdf to Moodle
  • Deadline extended to Sunday night at 11:59pm!

Week 15: Conclusions


Monday, December 5—History and the World Today

PREPARATION

  • No preparation necessary. Take a breather after completing your paper
  • Optional, if you want to think more about history and the world today
    • Read – but don’t get bogged down in detail – Pollard et al, “Epilogue, 2001 to Present,” Worlds Together Worlds Apart (2015) – in Moodle Readings Folder
    • Read Keylor, “Epilogue, A World of Nations in the Era of Globalization” – in Moodle Readings Folder

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • What global challenges shape the world today?
  • What challenges shape the different states and regions discussed by Pollard et al. in:
    • Europe, the United States, Japan
    • China, India, Russia
    • the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America
    • Identify 2-3 examples that you think are most important to understand global and regional challenges today.

IN CLASS

  • Debrief from presentations
  • Introduce final exam (see format and study guide online)
  • Problems of the Nation-State
  • The World Today
  • History as a Way of Understanding the World

Wednesday, December 7—Putting the World into Historical Context (Faculty Panel)

PREPARATION

  • Read your notes from the course
  • Prepare the study questions below

STUDY QUESTIONS

  • Come to class with
    • What are a few details (names, events, examples) that you learned from the course?
    • What are a few concepts (ideas, arguments, interpretations) that you learned from the course?
    • How can history help us understand the world today?

IN CLASS

  • Explanation of Final Exam
  • Share details and concepts
  • Small groups – essay question ideas & examples

Friday, December 9—Class Review and Celebration

PREPARATION

IN CLASS

  • Course Evaluations
  • Review
  • Celebration

Exam Week


Wednesday, December 14, 2022, 12:00 to 2:30pm

Final Exam

  • Meet in our regular classroom (come a few minutes early, ready to start at 12:00)
  • Bring your laptop computer
  • See full details on our Final Exam Study Guide – on our Handouts page